Shades of Black πŸ–€


After visiting Asmara a few years back , my view of coffee and hospitality changed.

Only a former Nairobian can confess this coz Nairobians and hospitality do not always fit in a sentence.

In Eritrea, and Ethiopia, any valued guest is always seen off with a coffee ceremony. This ceremony is done at home, at the hotel, at the restaurant, at the end of a baraza as well as ceremoniously. In the event, you did not have done in your honor by your Eritrean or Ethiopian friends, akufukuzaye hakuambii toka πŸ™„.

On matters hospitality, I learnt it is good to be hospitable and appreciate whatever level and type of hospitality is given especially in a culture different from yours. Remember, mkono mtupu haulambwi. Not to mean I am the most hospitable. No. In fact, there are times I just want to be with my husband and kids, only for someone to show up unexpectedly πŸ‘ΎπŸ€¦β€β™€οΈπŸ€·β€β™€οΈ.

Just be hospitable otherwise you may end up turning away someone who might have a solution to whatever is eating up memory space in your head at that time……reminds me of the Bible story of Sarah hosting the 2 angels. Had she ignored them, Jacob the swindler may not have been part of present day history.

This packet of coffee beans was purchased more than a year ago and stashed in the fridge conveniently……..in other words I placed it there and forgot that it ever existed till today.

Today morning, I wanted something different from the usual black tea punched with lemon & apple cider vinegar, homemade juice or ginger milk tea with whatever accompaniment is available.

Today’s different was strong black coffee with boiled maize.

Before we go any further, I am team Kenya all the way meaning 90% of the products, ingredients and etc in my kitchen are Kenyan. Proudly Kenyan.

Ingredients

  1. Coffee beans (unroasted)

What to do

  1. Get a wide pan and place it on high heat on your widest burner if using a gas/electric cooker.
  2. Caveat: work in an airy space.
  3. Place your coffee beans in the pan and wait for the crackling sound before starting to stir. The sound similar to that of groundnuts.
  4. Start stirring as often as the sound is there.
  5. The beans will start changing colour to a darker tone. Continue stirring till all of them get evenly dark.

If you zoom in, you will note that shades of black are uneven.

  • The more the crackling sound, the more the smoke. Do not be scared that you are burning the kitchen down. Refer to pint #2 above.

  • Keep stirring, despite coughing your lungs out {pun intended}, as you keep checking on the evenness of the shades of black.
  • One trick. I use is that the wooden cooking stick has an oily glare like this πŸ‘‡

Hiyo sio cooking oil (Google translate).

  • Switch off the heat, stir for 1 – 2 minutes as the pan cools down. This is because the beans at the bottom are still absorbing heat from the pan directly.
  • Let it cool down for an hour or two.
  • Grind in a grinder or blender.

  • Transfer to an air tight container and place in the fridge to retain the freshness and aroma.

Brew your coffee whenever the craving strikes.

Enjoy

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